bocktopus


lovesexdevotion:

That was so beautiful

lovesexdevotion:

That was so beautiful


16943 Notes | Posted on April 18, 2014 Source: blewm / jewapanese


4608 Notes | Posted on April 18, 2014 Source: mayor-brandy / ayuna

greatartinuglyrooms:

Monet, Manet, Renoir

greatartinuglyrooms:

Monet, Manet, Renoir




1927 Notes | Posted on April 18, 2014 Source: odeaosratos5 / deltaform

zeroambit:

thinksquad:

Mushrooms have an extraordinary ability to control the weather, scientists have learned. By altering the moisture of the air around them, they whip up winds that blow away their spores and help them disperse. Plants use a variety of methods to spread seeds, including gravity, forceful ejection, wind, water and animals. Mushrooms have long been thought of as passive seed spreaders, releasing their spores and then relying on air currents to carry them. But new research has shown that mushrooms are able to disperse their spores over a wide area even when there is not a breath of wind - by creating their own weather. Scientists in the US used high-speed filming techniques and mathematical modelling to show how oyster and Shitake mushrooms release water vapour that cools the air around them, creating convection currents. This in turn generates miniature winds that lift their spores into the air.

i for one welcome our fungal overlords

zeroambit:

thinksquad:

Mushrooms have an extraordinary ability to control the weather, scientists have learned.
By altering the moisture of the air around them, they whip up winds that blow away their spores and help them disperse.
Plants use a variety of methods to spread seeds, including gravity, forceful ejection, wind, water and animals. Mushrooms have long been thought of as passive seed spreaders, releasing their spores and then relying on air currents to carry them.
But new research has shown that mushrooms are able to disperse their spores over a wide area even when there is not a breath of wind - by creating their own weather.
Scientists in the US used high-speed filming techniques and mathematical modelling to show how oyster and Shitake mushrooms release water vapour that cools the air around them, creating convection currents. This in turn generates miniature winds that lift their spores into the air.

i for one welcome our fungal overlords

11026 Notes | Posted on April 18, 2014 Source: thinksquad / skeletim



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